Tag Archives: health care

Visualizing the Future of Health Care and On-site Food Production

For three years, Project SOIL has used case studies, pilot projects and visioning sessions to investigate the viability of on-site food production at public institutions, through collaborative arrangements with local food producers.

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Check out our final report!

Over that time, interest in food production on public land has continued to grow, with schools and universities, health care institutions and seniors residences, community food centres and food banks, as well as public agencies—from conservation authorities to crown corporations—making land available for food production.

Are you an engaged staff member, or an administrator at a public institution, who is interested in the idea of establishing food production or food gardens on-site? This research has established a baseline of preconditions, useful practices, potential barriers and positive adaptations—for a diverse set of institutional and community settings—that will allow project leads to envision how their idea would come to fruition, and build a compelling case.

Maybe you’re part of a community where public institutions control a significant amount of land, and you would like to develop a strategic vision that includes food production? Community groups, farmers, and organizations supporting urban agriculture, food security and food justice can use the information contained in the research report to identify what has worked in a situation similar to their own, and present this evidence to build a compelling proposal for their institutional partner.

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Or maybe you’re a policy-shaper—working with new and young farmer training organizations, or advocates of sustainable health care reform, sustainable urban agriculture practices, or community resilience in the face of climate change—to illustrate the potential of positive alternative strategies to build new collaborative partnerships with multiple, and often unanticipated, synergies and benefits.

Project SOIL has built strong relationships with community and institutional leaders that will continue to innovate and collaborate in the pursuit of the beneficial synergies that spring up when you grow food on public land.

Our final report, “Ontario Public Institutions and On-site Food Production: Visualizing the Future for Health Care“, is available now. Please share widely!

Development in Gardening

Growing Food at Health Care Facilities

Development In Gardening (DIG) empowers communities to develop sustainable community gardens improving the nutrition and quality of life for people living with HIV/AIDS, orphans, pregnant women and other vulnerable populations in Africa.

Acknowledged as an international leader in HIV/AIDS treatment and research as well as maternal and child health care, cervical cancer, malaria and tuberculosis treatment and research, the Center for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia (CIDRZ) remains rooted in approaching global health concerns on the community level first.

After being approached by leaders of their international team, DIG began to effectively address the nutritional and drug compliance needs of their HIV positive patients.  Four gardens were established at designated clinics in and around Kafue, Zambia with a specific focus on HIV positive mothers. Additionally, over 25 home gardens have been developed and will hopefully continually expand to reach more households.

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Growing Food with Purpose: three webinars

Emma’s Acres — L.I.N.C.

Lessons from the Farm at St. Joe’s

Project SOIL

 

Webinar 1

 

Tuesday, 21 October, 2014 – 13:00 EDT

Emma’s Acres — L.I.N.C.
Emma’s Acres is an agricultural social enterprise that 1) provides offenders with employment skills and reintegration supports as they are transitioning out of prison, 2) assists survivors of serious crime through the outreach worker funded in part by selling produce that is grown on site and 3) enhances the food security in the District of Mission by creating a year round local source of non- spray vegetables, herbs and flowers. “Inspiring hope… Helping victims one squash at a time.”

Sherry Edmunds-Flett, executive director of L.I.N.C., will be talking about digital storytelling and how it helps in project evaluation and getting the message out. A developmental evaluation of the Society’s activities was the result of a collaboration between the University of BC’s Research in Health and Healthcare Inequities and L.I.N.C.

For more details, please visit: http://foodsecurecanada.org/resources-news/webinars-podcasts/webinar-emmas-acres-linc
 

Webinar 2

 

Tuesday, 21 October, 2014 – 14:00 EDT

Lessons from the Farm at St. Joe’s

Leaders from Saint Joseph Mercy Health System will share their story, which includes The Farm at St. Joe’s, a 364-acre farm and educational experience on the grounds of St. Joseph Mercy in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where organic planting methods provide patients, staff, volunteers and visitors an experiential way to understand the link between fresh air, exercise, fresh food, good nutrition and good health. In this presentation, the staff behind the creation and management of the farm will share some of the lessons they’ve learned and insights into how other health care organizations can take what they’ve learned and adapt it for their own organization, how to generate support for environmental projects, how to find community partners and more.

For more details please visit: https://academy.practicegreenhealth.org/products/sustainable-operations-series-lessons-from-the-farm-at-st-joes
 

Webinar 3

 

Wednesday, October 22, 15:00 EDT

Project SOIL webinar

In Ontario, several institutions are already producing food on their properties as a way to generate revenue; supply nutritious fresh food for consumption (by staff, patients, students, etc.); provide skills training and therapeutic benefits; and build social enterprises.

Project SOIL is a three-year feasibility study that explores the potential of on-site food production at public health care and educational institutions in Ontario.  This webinar will share how project partners at health care, social service and educational institutions went about getting gardens off the ground at their institutions, as well as some of the lessons we learned in the first year of working with pilot projects across the province.

For more details, please visit: http://projectsoil.ca/2014/09/23/project-soil-webinar/

Project SOIL webinar

Shared Opportunities on Institutional LandsLakehead Psychiatric Hospital

Challenges and opportunities of on-site food production

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 3:00 – 4:30 p.m. EDT

In Ontario, several institutions are already producing food on their properties as a way to generate revenue; supply nutritious fresh food for consumption (by staff, patients, students, etc.); provide skills training and therapeutic benefits; and build social enterprises.

Project SOIL is a three-year feasibility study that explores the potential of on-site food production at public health care and educational institutions in Ontario.  This webinar will share how project partners at health care, social service and educational institutions went about getting gardens off the ground at their institutions, as well as some of the lessons we learned in the first year of working with pilot projects across the province.

Webinar participants will include:

  • Chef Christopher Jess, high school culinary arts instructor in Fergus Ontario, and the guiding force behind the Food School Farm (Centre Wellington District High School);
  • Doug Dowhos, Supervisor of Employment Options for St. Joseph’s Care Group and creator of the GreenWerks Garden social enterprise (Lakehead Psychiatric Hospital);
  • Tami Proctor, Registered Horticultural Therapist  leading the Victorian Garden project at Homewood Health Centre;
  • Louise Quenneville, Emergency Preparedness Coordinator and Project Manager at Hôpital Glengarry Memorial Hospital; and
  • Jenny Weickert, Our Farm coordinator at KW Habilitation.

For more information and to register, please contact Irena Knezevic at irena.knezevic@carleton.ca