From Local grains, Nutritional Benefits!

From Ag Innovation Ontario, the story of the Spruits, local producers who turn grains into superfoods:

…Last year, they grew 26 acres of heritage grains and are especially excited about two of them. The first is a hull-less barley, developed in Canada, which has half of the gluten found in wheat and high levels of beta-glucan fibre, vitamins and minerals.

The second is a non-GMO purple corn with origins in ancient Peru. When ground, it produces whole grain flour that is both a gluten-free alternative to wheat and has double the antioxidants found in blueberries. Too often, she said, people with gluten allergies will turn to substitutions that have little nutritional value.

And just as unfortunate, she noted that “so many of the superfoods that people are buying are imported from other countries”. The grains that the Spruits produce solve both issues – superfoods with high nutritional values that are grown “right here at home”.

Four products – Purple Corn Flour, Purple Corn Meal, Beta-Glucan Barley Flour and Barley Berries – are available commercially. Spruit has been promoting the line within culinary and health networks, and many restaurants and bakeries in the Ottawa area are now incorporating the flour and corn meal into their products.

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Harvesting Health: Investigating the Therapeutic Effects of Gardens

On April 18, 2016 @ Hôpital Glengarry Memorial Hospital, an interdisciplinary team of grad students in the Health: Science, Technology and Policy program at Carleton University presented their report reviewing the health benefits of gardens, and providing an inventory of tools that can be used to track such benefits. Harvesting Health: Investigating the Therapeutic Effects of Gardens is their capstone project, and available on our website. The tools will be coming soon!

For questions or further information please contact irena.knezevic@carleton.ca

 

Healing Garden Research

Therapeutic Landscapes: An Evidence-Based Approach to Designing Healing
Clare Cooper Marcus, Naomi A Sachs (Wiley Press – 2013)
Therapeutic Landscapes focuses critical attention on the design and creation of landscapes that promote health and well-being, emphasizing the importance of evidence-based design to meet the needs of specific patient populations, as well as those of visitors and staff. It presents an overview of healing gardens and therapeutic landscapes from planning to post-occupancy evaluation and offers guidelines on which landscape architects, healthcare administrators, and funders to base their decisions.

RESTORATIVE GARDEN DESIGN: Enhancing wellness through healing spaces  (free download)
M. Susan Erickson (Journal of Art and Design Discourse) June 2012 no.2 89-102.
Current research from a variety of academic disciplines reveals that contact with nature provides stress reduction, which in turn leads to improved health outcomes. This research leads to additional questions—what kind of contact with nature? How much? Are there certain types of plants which are more therapeutic than others?

See our research page on the Therapeutic Benefits of Gardens in Health Care Facilities

Harvesting Health: A Research Report & Visioning Session

Join us from 10:00am – noon, April 18, 2016 @ Hôpital Glengarry Memorial Hospital for a presentation reviewing the health benefits of gardens, and providing an inventory of tools that can be used to track such benefits. Harvesting Health: Investigating the Therapeutic Effects of Gardens  is the capstone project produced and delivered by the interdisciplinary team in the Health: Science, Technology and Policy program at Carleton University. This will be followed by an exploratory, ‘blue sky’ assessment of the near and long-term options and possibilities for the HGMH Therapeutic Gardens.

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10:00 Presentation – Harvesting Health: Investigating the Therapeutic Effects of Gardens

11:00 A Blue Sky Visioning Session

A discussion of possibilities, including which factors will determine:

  • …the optimal size / scale of food production on site?
    The purpose of production; end use the food; reliance on facility staff for maintenance; future facility expansion; access for visitors / community; access for patients
  • …the best use of the land?
    From forest garden to silvi-pasture (just kidding), which purposes and factors will most limit or shape production? Risks; therapy; extension of the wheelchair-accessible raised beds; compost; future building site expansion; greenhouse[s]
  • … the best use of the food?
    In patient’s meals (menu needs, food safety, nutrition, etc.) or elsewhere (sale to staff, on-site farmers market, sale in local grocer / retail, donation to emergency food provider)
  • …the best program / project model?
    Through a dot-mocracy, following discussion of the various options: volunteer-led; social enterprise with on-staff farmer and/or volunteer coordinator; partnership with a private farmer, a community organization, or a non-profit; a Community garden. What are the operational implications of different models

12:00 – 12:30 Lunch and Site mapping session (Material: large map, mylar, markers)

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On-Site Food Production, Its Benefits, Barriers, and Opportunities

Available today, from Health Environments Research & Design Journal, a new article: “Shared Opportunities on Institutional Lands: On-Site Food Production, Its Benefits, Barriers, and Opportunities“, by Irena Knezevic, Phil Mount, and Chantal Clement.

Shared Opportunities on Institutional Lands: On-Site Food Production, Its Benefits, Barriers, and Opportunities

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Abstract
Aim: This article outlines preliminary findings of a 3-year project that explored on-site food pro- duction on institutional properties, primarily healthcare facilities. Background: There are growing pressures on healthcare facilities to improve their food offerings and incorporate food gardens into their health programs. While several healthcare facilities produce food on-site, there are few studies that explore opportunities, capacities, and institutional barriers related to on-site food production. Methods: The study employed mixed methods including historical review, case studies, surveys, interviews, pilot garden projects, and Geographic Information System mapping. The number of par- ticipating institutions varied by method. Results: Benefits associated with on-site food production can be health, economic, environmental, and social. There are also institutional barriers including administrative roadblocks, perceived obstacles, and the difficulty in quantitatively, measuring the qualitatively documented benefits. Conclusions: The benefits of food gardens far outweigh the challenges. On-site food production has tremendous potential to improve nutrition for staff and patients, offer healing spaces, better connect institutions with the communities in which they are located, and provide the long-professed benefits of gardening for all involved—from therapeutic benefits and outdoor physical activities to developing skills and social relationships in ways that few other activities do.