Taking ‘Food as Medicine’ to Heart

…from ABC News… A Story of Two Hospitals

St. Joseph’s Hospital in Ann Arbor, Michigan, hosts a farmers market every Wednesday in its main lobby featuring produce gown on the hospital’s 25-acre farm. The land used for the farm was a hospital lawn until 2010 when a horse-drawn plow broke ground on the first 4 acres. The farm, now known as “The Farm at St. Joe’s,” has since expanded to include three large “hoop houses,” greenhouse-like structures that provide seasonal produce for the market — as well as patient meals, the hospital’s cafeteria and local food banks — all year long.

Across the country in Long Island, New York, Stony Brook Medicine has also embraced the idea of “farm to bedside.” Iman Marghoob, a registered dietician and horticultural specialist in charge of the hospital’s 4,000-square-foot rooftop garden, said the project is just as important for educating staff, patients and students as it is for providing seasonal vegetables and herbs.

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Development in Gardening

Growing Food at Health Care Facilities

Development In Gardening (DIG) empowers communities to develop sustainable community gardens improving the nutrition and quality of life for people living with HIV/AIDS, orphans, pregnant women and other vulnerable populations in Africa.

Acknowledged as an international leader in HIV/AIDS treatment and research as well as maternal and child health care, cervical cancer, malaria and tuberculosis treatment and research, the Center for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia (CIDRZ) remains rooted in approaching global health concerns on the community level first.

After being approached by leaders of their international team, DIG began to effectively address the nutritional and drug compliance needs of their HIV positive patients.  Four gardens were established at designated clinics in and around Kafue, Zambia with a specific focus on HIV positive mothers. Additionally, over 25 home gardens have been developed and will hopefully continually expand to reach more households.

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